woody2 pup sat.jpg

Curly Coat/Dry Eye 

And 

Episodic Falling

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club's members would regard not knowing the health status of dogs used for breeding regarding these conditions as totally irresponsible. 

 

The simple, non-invasive DNA test tells you whether a dog is either clear, a carrier or affected.  It does not mean that you cannot breed from a carrier but you have to select a clear dog to ensure that you do not produce affected puppies.  The parents of your puppy may be hereditarily clear or have been DNA tested.

curly%20coat%20form_edited.jpg

An example of Curly Coat Dry Eye Syndrome DNA Certificate

Dry Eye / Curly Coat (DE/CC) affects a dog’s skin and eyes. Affected dogs are unable to produce tears due to the lack of watery secretions from the lacrimal glands, making their eyes very sore. Their skin becomes very dry and flaky, particularly around the foot, and this can make walking and standing difficult and painful.

 

For curly coat - A dry and an unusually curly coat are apparent at birth. Excessive oiliness, skin deterioration and inflammation are effects of this syndrome.

For dry eye - dogs show their discomfort by rubbing their eyes, squinting and being sensitive to light. Eye(s) may be inflamed and reddened, or the cornea may appear dry and dull. There is commonly a thick mucousy discharge in the eye or in the area around the eye.

Some dogs will be known as 'Hereditarily Clear', these results have previously shown on their Kennel Club Registration Certificates.  Under the Kennel Club's new system they are now only available on the Kennel Club's Health Test Results Finder. 

An example of Episodic Falling DNA Certificate

EF is a neurological condition, induced by exercise, excitement or frustration, in which muscle tone increases. This means the dog is unable to relax its muscles, causing the dog to become rigid and falls over.

Affected dogs usually start to demonstrate clinical signs before one year of age, with most cases having their first episode aged 4-7 months. Clinical signs vary in severity ranging from mild, occasional falling to freezing or seizure-like episodes lasting hours. Severity of the episodes can increase or decrease as the dog gets older. There is no standard pattern to the attacks.

Some dogs will be known as 'Hereditarily Clear', these results have previously shown on their Kennel Club Registration Certificates.  Under the Kennel Club's new system they are now only available on the Kennel Club's Health Test Results Finder. 

EF%20Form_edited.jpg